New Countertops

New countertops are often on the minds of homeowners. If it’s not because you are longing for that high-end granite you see on HGTV remodeling shows, it might be because you are hoping to sell your home and want to add equity and sell-ability with one fix. Or maybe you recently had new countertops installed and are anxious to care for them the right way.

Fear not! New countertops are one of the best ways to add equity to your home. If you don’t have the budget for granite but are tired of your same-old kitchen, there are plenty of stylish options out there.

Popular Countertop Options

Here’s a rundown of some of the most popular kinds of new countertops.

Granite

While some home remodelers are saying granite isn’t as much in favor anymore as it was ten years ago, granite is still one of the most beautiful and durable surfaces you can use as kitchen countertops and it’s still very popular. It’s a natural material, which means no two kitchens covered in granite will be the same color or have the same markings. You can choose a bold pattern to make a statement or a relatively uniform pattern to complement the other finishings in your kitchen.

Quartz

Quartz countertops are making a surge forward in popularity right now. It also goes by the name engineered stone because of its construction. Quartz is a man-made blend of quartz chips and resin and has a more uniform look than granite. It can be found in many colors and patterns, which may appeal to those wanting a wider range of choices than what can be found in a natural stone. Quartz is very durable and almost as attractive as granite.

Butcher Block

Want the beauty of a natural element without the high cost of granite? Wood can offer all that, with do-it-yourself options abounding on Pinterest and the like. If you are not the do-it-yourself kind, commercial butcher block options are available at a much lower price point than granite or quartz. Like granite, if butcher block tops are treated right, they can last a lifetime. They need to be oiled to be waterproof once a year.

Concrete

Another versatile and surprisingly gorgeous surface is concrete. For those who love an industrial look, concrete can be tinted, honed, polished, and aged to look almost any way you want. Be aware that they are very heavy, and although you could relatively cheaply do-it-yourself, pouring and leveling concrete - ensuring there are no bubbles - is an art better left to those who are practiced. It also has to be sealed often or it will crack.

Marble

Marble is surprisingly affordable and very classy. This soft stone is vulnerable to chips, cracks, and staining which makes it less than ideal. However, some homeowners enjoy the wine stains and small scratches that show a life well-lived. Some really like the exceptional baking surface it provides. If this is you, a new marble countertop might be in your future.

Soapstone

Another softer tile, soapstone offers an unusual look, feel, and color compared to marble or granite. A dark gray color that darkens over time, soapstone will need to be oiled frequently in order not to crack, but the value and interest it adds will be well worth the work it takes. This is an especially good option for older homes to keep a feeling of your home’s period.

Solid Surfacing

This material is also known as Corian®. It’s made of polyester and acrylic and it comes in a wide range of colors. It is easily installed and requires almost no maintenance. Flaws can be sanded out. The downside is that it does look much more artificial than natural materials.

Takeaway

Changing your countertops will not only benefit your kitchen now, it will add equity to your home should you choose to sell. One of these options can add beauty and value to your kitchen all by itself.